M&M Cookies

On September 13, 2007, a tractor trailer carrying 20,000 pounds of M&M’s Cookies overturned in San Bernardino, spilling cookies all over the highway. In the photos, it looks like it’s just M&M’s, but if you look closely, you’ll see that it says M&M Cookies. Nobody was hurt. It took crews several hours to clean up the mess (and, no doubt, stuff their cars with cookies).

KNBC TV

Light Beer

A tractor-trailer loaded with Keystone Light beer overturned near Denver, CO on the morning of May 15, 2008, spilling cases of beer on I-70 and closing the ramp for several hours.
Crews reopened the ramp at about 3 p.m., according the Colorado Department of Transportation.

Wheat Ridge police spokeswoman Lisa Stigall said the truck driver transporting 12-pack cases of Keystone Light in cans lost control on the wet highway.

The truck hit a curve too fast and tipped over, tearing the side and top of the trailer and spewing beer cans down the embankment. The driver was not seriously injured. Some of the beer survived, too. It was transferred to another truck by hand.

The “uninjured” beer, as Stigall called it, was being transferred by hand to another truck.

The far right lane of I-70 was closed this afternoon because the nose of the beer truck protruded onto the shoulder, she said. Still, traffic on eastbound I-70 was “flowing nicely.”

She said the highway could still close when a wrecker is brought in to flip the beer truck back over.
On A tractor-trailer loaded with beer overturned on a ramp to Interstate 70 this morning, spilling cases of brew on the roadway and closing the ramp for hours.

The Navaho Express rig overturned about 10:30 a.m. on the ramp from Colorado Highway 58 to the eastbound lanes of the interstate in Wheat Ridge.

Keystone Light’s slogan is “Always smooth, even when you’re not.” On Tuesday, a semi tractor-trailer hauling a load of Keystone was anything but smooth as it rolled over, spilling beer and fuel all over the roadway.
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In the last photo, young men can be seen “salvaging” cans of beer. I couldn’t determine if they were with the crew that was tranferring the beer to another truck, or local guys transferring the beer to their fridge.

Denver Post, and other sources

 

 

Lumber

This lumber spill looks like a pile of matchsticks.

 

 

Olympic Coins

On February 7, 2008, a truck carrying commemorative coins for the Royal Canadian Mint fell 40 feet off the TransCanada Highway in British Columbia spilling it’s load. The truck was hauling “snowboarder” commemorative coins issued by the mint to promote the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver.

The driver and a passenger were OK. They also managed to avoid a 1,000 foot fall into Kamloops Lake.

A driver that pulled up to help had to scamble up a four-foot pile of coins to get into the truck to help the driver.

David Blair

 

Murray Mitchel

 

Tomahawk Missile

On July 21, 2006, a Tomahawk Cruise Missile fell off a truck and landed in the middle of the highway near the Bronx.

The truck was carrying the Cruise Missile on I-95 in New York on its way from Rhode Island to Virginia when it broke down and was rear-ended by another tractor-trailer. This knocked the missile off the truck and onto the highway. The missile remained in it’s fiberglass protective box.

The NYC Police Department only stated that it was an “inert ordnance”, but the NYC Fire Department confirmed that it was a Tomahawk missile. The NYPD bomb squad removed the ordnance. It was not armed.

One news account said that it was actually a dummy missile used for training. (“No, no, we didn’t drop an actual missile, it was…er… a dummy missile. Yeah, that’s it. A dummy. In it’s own specially-made fiberglass case. No, really!”)

Thanks to Laurie in Colorado for this Truck Spill.

WCBS Newsradio photos: Tom Kaminski

Milk

This Russian Truck crashed in Lithuania, spilling its load of milk on the road.
“Pienas” is Lithuanian for “Milk”.

Lava

Technically, not a truck spill, but lava on the road is pretty cool, nonetheless. I mean, how often do you see that?

This photo shows where a flow from the Pu’u O’o lava tube system in Hawaii overspilled the Chain of Craters Road near the coast in 1995.

 

Another lava flow over the Chain of Craters road in 2004.

 

 

Jell-O Snack Packs

On April 23, 2008, a tractor-trailer overturned on I-95 in St. John’s County, Florida, spilling Jell-O Snack Packs all over the roadway.

The truck flipped after it ran into another truck, which splattered individual Jell-O packs all over the highway, which caused a major traffic jam. The driver was trapped inside the truck, but was rescued, airlifted, and treated for non-life-threatening injuries.

No one else was hurt. Bill Cosby is distraught.

 

CBS News

House

I can’t find any information on this photo. It would appear that a modular home being delivered, tipped the delivery truck or crane.

UPDATE 4/13/08:

Dave C wrote “The picture is actually of a crane tipped over – onto/into the house. The house is delivered in parts and then placed on the foundation or the other pieces by a crane.”

Close enough for me to include it here.

 

ICBM Rocket Booster

On July 31, 2008, in Bismarck, N.D., an Air Force truck carrying an ICBM Rocket Booster overturned in a ditch.

The truck was on the way from Minot Air Force Base to a launch facility in Northwestern North Dakota, when it somehow “crashed” and overturned. The truck was carrying an unarmed booster rocket for a Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile.

The truck and rocket, weighing 75,000 pounds were still lying in the ditch a few days later under armed guard and an Air Force spokeswoman, Maj. Laurie Arellano, said that it would be there for a few more days while the incident is in the “assessment phase” and the Air Force determines if it is stable.

Local residents were not in the least bit worried about the missile. They are used to the military moving such things around and they trust them to be sure the missile is safe.

Update: Eventually, it cost the military $5.6 million to recover the truck and missile booster from this accident. The truck remained on the side of the road along with the rocket for more than a week until they were removed. The Air Force placed blame for the indicent on the “driver and safety observer error”.

I would point out a few things about this incident.

If the military could be trusted, there wouldn’t be an ICBM rocket lying in a ditch.

If you were the military spokesperson and they crashed an armed rocket booster, would you admit that it was armed, or would you report that it was unarmed?

The only photo I could locate of this incident was apparently taken and released by the Air Force, so the details are limited.

 

Via AP, Photo by the US Air Force

 

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